in the gaps

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in the gaps

it’s going to be – argh, it’s Wednesday – it IS one of those weeks: those weeks where any writing seems miraculous… and not because of its quality.

I have lovely visitors, my parents, who are helpful with the kids and the housework, and good company as well – aren’t I lucky? I also have the back end of a cold, as do the kids. Elena, my four-month-old, is back to having just one feed in the middle of the night, thank god, but I’m still recovering from the past few weeks of crazy-multiple-feed-nights and interrupted naps during the day. So I’m tired. Tired = poor decision making and short attention span. So when I have a moment free, when I could write, I’m liable to accidentally spend that time on pinterest… or eating… or staring into space… or checking the television schedule for the rest of the day to see if there’s anything worth recording…

However, I’d really like to fill the gaps with a bit of writing – just a bit, every day. Monday was a write-off (tehe, pun), but yesterday I revised (again) chapter one and Mum read it, spotted a few confusing bits, very helpful.

Between now and friday it will be polished and ready for writers group. If I say it, declare it, many times, loud and bold, then it is bound to happen.

I’d also like to write a short-story version of the story, as a kind of writing-exercise. I need to choose one pivotal moment of the story to hone in on. I’m thinking the second protest rally, the one where Jamie decides to commit to the cause, and all the craziness, to tell her parents the truth and let the chips fall wherever…

Louis is at halte jeux for another half an hour, so starting anything now seems silly, but it might be my best shot all day, so here I go…

The protesters were easy to identify – they weren’t drinking beer, they weren’t wearing rugby colours and then there was the dead give-away: they carried placards and crosses. Perhaps, just maybe, they were trying to stand out.

Well, duh.

But Jamie preferred to blend in, like the peachy eye-shadow you could get away with wearing to school. Life was simpler, safer that way. No detention, no missing half of first period French waiting around outside the deputy principal’s office for the make-up remover.

Today, however, she would be blending in with this stand-out lot…